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Film Review: All Forms of Heroism Available in ‘Black Panther’

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CHICAGO – The fortune of the latest Marvel Studios superhero epic, “Black Panther,” lies in its solid foundation in African mythos and intelligent storytelling. And with Ryan Coogler (“Creed”) as director, there are still major confrontations and battles, intertwined into the soul.

HollywoodChicago.com Oscarman rating: 5.0/5.0
Rating: 5.0/5.0

There are many pleasures in the journey of the narrative, including tributes to other films and eras. The cast is top drawer, led by the sizzling hot Chadwick Boseman (“42”) and Michael B. Jordan (the lead in “Creed”). They portray star-crossed cousins, one an African king of an isolationist nation and one a “boy from the hood” of Oakland. The truth of their confrontation is part of the destiny for their homeland, both in America and the fictional kingdom of Wakanda. The clash of culture and ideology is a stunning tribute as well to Black History Month. The heroics of “Black Panther” is about several layers of salvation.

After a glimpse of the hero Black Panther/T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) in “Captain America: Civil War,” and the death of his father T’Chaka (John Kani), the young African prince must go back to his homeland of Wakanda to become king. His nation is third world to the rest of the planet, but harbors a secret – the harvesting of a space ore called vibranium has given the nation a utopia of technology and self sustaining economy.

Black Panther’s first assignment as king is to bring down his enemy Klaue (Andy Serkis), who has stolen a vibranium artifact with the aid of American Erik Stevens (Michael B. Jordan). Stevens has a past secret and desires to confront T’Challa with that history. Their fates are tied together, and has future implications for Wakanda and the world around it.

”Black Panther” opens everywhere on February 16th, in 3D IMAX and regular screenings. See local listings for IMAX theaters and show times. Featuring Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Martin Freeman, Angela Bassett, Forest Whittaker, Andy Serkis and Sterling K. Brown. Written by Ryan Coogler and Joe Robert Cole. Directed by Ryan Coogler. Rated “PG-13”

StarContinue reading for Patrick McDonald’s full review of “Black Panther”

The Title Character (Chadwick Boseman) in ‘Black Panther’
Photo credit: Walt Disney Studios

StarContinue reading for Patrick McDonald’s full review of “Black Panther”

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