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Jill Scott

Film Review: James Brown Bio ‘Get On Up’ Stuck in a Funk

Get On Up

CHICAGO – “Get On Up” contains one dynamite performance trapped in a frustratingly mediocre movie. James Brown’s life and music offer a wealth of material to work with, that doesn’t necessarily adhere to the conventions of a formulaic musical biopic.

Film Review: ‘Baggage Claim’ is Equivalent of a Crash Landing

CHICAGO – Experiencing an unfunny comedy is one of the most painful time wasters in the movie going adventure – not only will that time never come back, but wanting to laugh when no motivation for hilarity is produced is like having eternal hiccups. “Baggage Claim” (hic) is (hic) that (hic) sort of movie.

Blu-Ray Review: ‘Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married Too?’

Why Did I Get Married Too?

CHICAGO – Tyler Perry’s films have been steadily improving but the ones that work still rely heavily on their leading ladies – for example, Taraji P. Henson in “I Can Do Bad All By Myself” and Angela Bassett in “Meet the Browns.” The quartet of women in “Why Did I Get Married Too?” can’t elevate the substandard writing and cheap cliche in the same way and the dramedy ends up one of Perry’s worst in years.

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  • Monica Raymund on set for 'Tanya'

    CHICAGOTV fans know Monica Raymund as paramedic Gabby Dawson on the long-running “Chicago Fire.” But the talented actor is expanding her range, debuting her first film as director, “Tanya,” at the Midwest Independent Film Festival on Tuesday, August 1st, 2017. The short film – written by Sam Forman – will be part of “Female Filmmakers Night” at the Midwest Indie, and is part of Raymund’s involvement with Hidden Tears Project, an organization dedicated to raising consciousness by creating media on gender inequality, sexual abuse and human trafficking.

  • They're Playing Our Song

    CHICAGO – During the late disco era of the 1970s, an unusual musical opened on Broadway. Essentially a two person stage play, “They’re Playing Our Song” involved a songwriter and a lyricist who develop a stronger connection than just writing partners. The always passionate Brown Paper Box Co. of Chicago has unearthed this chestnut with a bright and fun revival at the Rivendell Theatre through August 20th, 2017.

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